Chapter 6 - Assistive Technology and Play


Enter the important information from chapters here for a quick reference (use bullets)

  • Play is learning. About enjoyment, satisfaction and fun.
  • Play is the vehicle for children to experiment with home and community environments they experience on a daily basis.
  • Positive affect, multiple engagement, little reality
  • play is the avenue for young children to form neural pathways, build communication, thinking, social emot. skills, self help competencies that are intrigal to later school achievement
  • Play may be diffuclt to access for children with developmental delays
  • AT devices offer methods to increase access to play
  • Understanding stages of play helps to assist those children with dis. to play
  • The functional capacity of play can be modified through direct instruction
  • Sensory play
  • functional play
  • constructive play
  • pretend play
  • Toys help children develop problem solving skills
  • The first consideratino for wheather a toy might be appropriate for a child depends on its sensory aspects of sound, visual, and touch.
  • Access to a toy means that a child must be able to touch, see, and initiate action
  • access for children with dis is the key to consider when examining the apporpriateness of toys. Access characteristics allow for determining whether adaptions can be made to the materials in order for the utilization of the toy to be successful
  • Several organizations that provide info for toy selection: The National Lekotek Center, the Fisher Price website, the Universal Design for Play Tool (the Let's Play Project website)
  • Positioning for pley includes adjusting the environment, individual seating arrangements, toy location, toy's components, and mode of delivery
  • Using visual, auditory,and tactile labels offers children with disabilities more avenues for recognizing and slecting toys
  • Next step to gaining access to a toy is evaluation whether the child is in a position to manipulate it
  • adjustments to the toy may be warranted once the child is in a comfortable position for exploring
  • After the toy is accessible and stabilized, consider adapting the toy parts
  • Last, the mode of delivery for playing with the toy may need to be changed.
  • Switches offer access to battery operated toys when the on/off swithch is small and diff to manuever.
  • Because switches come in a variety of shapes and sizes, the recommendations concerning switch characteristics are critical to successful selection
  • To determine the appropriateness of particular switches for young children with disabilities it is imperative that their physical access style is determined.
  • Table 6.5 lists different switches and gives a description, purpose
  • switches need to be individualized to determined needs
  • Last part of the chapter gave more specific examples of individualizing specific areas of classroom to allow access for play
  • using switches to sequence the play scenarios and allowing the kids to interact with each other to allow all chidren to participate
  • Described "theme baskets" to include go talks, velcro modified toys, etc., all around the theme of the classroom to allow for easy access to play situations