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Friday, December 14

  1. page KathleenRuth edited Email: kruth@orange.k12.oh.us My favorite personal/professional use of technology My favorite …

    Email: kruth@orange.k12.oh.us
    My favorite personal/professional use of technology
    My favorite use of technology has to be email and information surfing. I love having the ability to download photos from a camera and edit and print only the ones I want. I also enjoy making theme flipcharts to use with our preschoolers on the Promethean board.
    The most frustrating aspect of using "technology"
    Computers are a wonderful thing except when you run into a gliche and have to wait for a repair. I can spend hours looking for a solution. Depending on software, editing and fixing photos can take up lots of time as well. Keeping up with the lastest piece of "new" technology can be very costly.
    Vision Statement for our classroom
    To have our classroom be a place where the children have access to different types of technology.
    To incorporate more technology into daily lessons and activities.
    To have classroom website for children and parents
    To post videos and classroom photos onto Flip.com and Snapfish more frequently.
    To use technology for organization, classroom management, and classroom environment.
    How are you currently engaging students through the use of technology?
    We have two desktop Macs in our room set up for the preschoolers to use. There's a timer right next to the computer table to monitor their "turns". It is on everyday for them to use with appropriate preschool learning games. We recently added a Promethean white board to each of the three preschool rooms. Our circle time activities are mostly done on the board as well as small group instruction. They enjoy using the "magic board". The children love using the digital camera and taking pictures of their friends and everything else in the room. They have had the opportunity to use the Flip Video but it is a little confusing to explain how to use it to them. The children usually see me using the Flip to record their "performances". In our school district, we are able to apply for a PTA grant every year. This year we ordered two mini Dell netbooks for our classroom and a set of student/teacher pens so two children can write on the whiteboard at the same time.
    1. Think about the materials you created/used or the ways that you used your camera or Flip:
    What was your objective for this activity?
    How did you plan to monitor/assess children's learning?
    How did you incorporate UDL principles into this?
    How did you represent the ideas/concepts/skills in different ways?
    What options did children have for expression?
    In what types of ways were children engaged?
    What behaviors did you observe to let you know that your children were engaged?
    2. What websites that we explored at our last session did you use?
    How did they fit into your lesson plan?
    How did your children respond?
    What types of materials did you download and use?
    April 23, 2010
    One of my main objectives for this workshop was to build a classroom website where I can post photos and information as to what's going on in the classroom. Our website is www.caplinskids.weebly.com. I have posted some photos on there from our fieldtrip to Lake Farmpark. The only thing I was disappointed in was that I couldn't post videos unless I pay monthly for the site. I've been using the Flip a lot especially when there is action happening both in the classroom and on fieldtrips. I love the fact that you can take a snapshot from the Flip frames. Lots of times I miss the action photo with the digital camera and this way I can go frame by frame for the perfect shot. I've been letting the kids use the camera and the Flip. The afternoon class really loves the camera more than the Flip and have taken hundreds of photos.

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    7:21 am

Friday, March 18

  1. page AT 3-18-11 edited ... Onion Mountain Technology Prentke Romich Company - regional consultant Amy Sonntag Proxtalk…
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    Onion Mountain Technology
    Prentke Romich Company - regional consultant Amy Sonntag
    Proxtalker
    R.J. Cooper & Associates
    Saltillo - regional distributor Forbes Rehab Services
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    10:54 am
  2. page AT 3-18-11 edited ... Assistive Technology Day 3 March 18, 2011 CLIFF NOTES Cliff Notes - ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY…
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    Assistive Technology Day 3
    March 18, 2011
    CLIFF NOTESCliff Notes - ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR YOUNG CHILDREN CREATING INCLUSIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTSAssistive Technology for Young Children Creating Inclusive Learning Environments
    CHAPTER 5 - ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATIONAssistive Technology and Communication
    CHAPTER 6- ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND PLAYAssistive Technology and Play
    CHAPTER 7 - ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND EMERGENT LITERACYAssistive Technology and Emergent Literacy
    Where can you learn about AT tools?
    Abledata
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    8:39 am
  3. page AT 3-18-11 edited ... Closing the Gap conference - October in Minneapolis CSUN International Technology & Perso…
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    Closing the Gap conference - October in Minneapolis
    CSUN International Technology & Persons with Disabilities Conference - Spring in Los Angeles
    Blogs andblogGood blog posts about iPod/iPads in early childhoodthe iPad and reading
    How will iPad picture books affect young reader's literacy?
    Resources related to apps
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    8:36 am
  4. page AT 3-18-11 edited ... Tobii - regional consultant Dan Lipka Words+ - regional consultant Eileen Cubarney Events a…
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    Tobii - regional consultant Dan Lipka
    Words+ - regional consultant Eileen Cubarney
    Events and Conferences
    2011 Assistive Technology Vendor Fair sponsored by SST Regions 1, 2, 6 & 7 in Findlay, Ohio on April 15 (free)
    ATIA conference in Chicago or Orlando
    Closing the Gap conference - October in Minneapolis
    CSUN International Technology & Persons with Disabilities Conference - Spring in Los Angeles

    Blogs andblog posts about iPod/iPads in early childhood
    How will iPad picture books affect young reader's literacy?
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    8:36 am
  5. page AT 3-18-11 edited ... AT What Every Educator Needs to Know from Karen Janowski Assistive Technology Blogs Patti's…
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    AT What Every Educator Needs to Know from Karen Janowski
    Assistive Technology Blogs
    Patti's Live Binder - my portfolio
    Vendor sites
    Ability Hub
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    8:30 am
  6. page Chapter 7 AT-Emergent Literacy edited ... Preliteracy and Emergent literacy are used to describe the same period of development includin…
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    Preliteracy and Emergent literacy are used to describe the same period of development including infant, toddler and preschool years. Preliteracy includes early developmental experiences such as early communication, play, and exposure to many froms of literacy inclding books. Emergent literacy includes specific skills including print and alphabet awareness, comprehension, phonolgoical awareness and early writing. (Figure 7.1 on page 125)
    Family Literacy and Assistive Technology:
    ...
    environments, young hildrenchildren frequently experience
    Linguistice Access
    Simplifying books is a critical element to meet the developmenal needs and language level of each individual child. In order to simplify language to make it accessible to each child, adults needs to stress key words, shorten sentences, and abbreviate the text within books to maintain the child's attention and engagement while reading the book together. Other low-tech strategies include covering up excessive text so that only key words are visible and using transparent highlighter tape to emphasize key words in the text that relate to pictures or story elements in the book. Also, adults can editorialize the text to shorten phrases, simplify concepts and use vocabulary that is within the understanding level of the individual child. (Table 7.2 page 134)
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    8:01 am
  7. page Chapter 7 AT-Emergent Literacy edited ... Experiences that support early literacy development occur in typical daily activites within th…
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    Experiences that support early literacy development occur in typical daily activites within the context of family life. Routine activites, such as groery shopping with a young child while the adult points tho the logo or label on favorite cerals, help promote recognition of symbols and print awarenes. Throughout the daily environments, young hildren frequently experience expose to print as they observe adults and family members making lists and reading menus, newspapers, magazines, and books. Simple adaptations to daily activites can enable children to participate, take turns, make choices, and build language skills to support emergent literacy skills (see table 7.1 on page 131).
    Linguistice Access
    ...
    text so tahtthat only key
    Cognitive Access
    ...
    learning. Adults neeneed to assist children to connecctconnect their experience
    ...
    form of objexts,objects, photographs, icons,
    ...
    to the concepsconcepts in a particular bookmbook such as
    ...
    Bear or battery-opperatedbattery-operated frog with
    ...
    pictures, and bocabularyvocabulary content in
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    7:56 am
  8. page Chapter 6 AT-Play edited ... functional play constructive play pretent pretend play Toys help children develop proble…
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    functional play
    constructive play
    pretentpretend play
    Toys help children develop problem solving skills
    The first consideratino for wheather a toy might be appropriate for a child depends on its sensory aspects of sound, visual, and touch.
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    7:53 am
  9. page Chapter 7 AT-Emergent Literacy edited ... Chapter 7 - Assistive Technology and Emergent Literacy Enter the important information from c…
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    Chapter 7 - Assistive Technology and Emergent Literacy
    Enter the important information from chapters here for a quick reference (use bullets)
    Preliteracy and Emergent Literacy:
    Preliteracy and Emergent literacy are used to describe the same period of development including infant, toddler and preschool years. Preliteracy includes early developmental experiences such as early communication, play, and exposure to many froms of literacy inclding books. Emergent literacy includes specific skills including print and alphabet awareness, comprehension, phonolgoical awareness and early writing. (Figure 7.1 on page 125)
    Family Literacy and Assistive Technology:
    Experiences that support early literacy development occur in typical daily activites within the context of family life. Routine activites, such as groery shopping with a young child while the adult points tho the logo or label on favorite cerals, help promote recognition of symbols and print awarenes. Throughout the daily environments, young hildren frequently experience expose to print as they observe adults and family members making lists and reading menus, newspapers, magazines, and books. Simple adaptations to daily activites can enable children to participate, take turns, make choices, and build language skills to support emergent literacy skills (see table 7.1 on page 131).
    Linguistice Access
    Simplifying books is a critical element to meet the developmenal needs and language level of each individual child. In order to simplify language to make it accessible to each child, adults needs to stress key words, shorten sentences, and abbreviate the text within books to maintain the child's attention and engagement while reading the book together. Other low-tech strategies include covering up excessive text so taht only key words are visible and using transparent highlighter tape to emphasize key words in the text that relate to pictures or story elements in the book. Also, adults can editorialize the text to shorten phrases, simplify concepts and use vocabulary that is within the understanding level of the individual child. (Table 7.2 page 134)
    Cognitive Access
    The child's knowledge and understanding of the relationships between the objects, people, and event in his or her daiily environments enables further learning. Adults nee to assist children to connecct their experience with the contents of the books. Additional adaptions using low-tech AT include using props in the form of objexts, photographs, icons, and other materials that extend the concepts and vocabulary in the book to the child's cognitive understanding. Examples of props include pictures mounted on thin sticky-back foam and laminated with velcro attachments to the pages of the book. Stuffed animal, puppets, or toys may also be used as props when related to the conceps in a particular bookm such as teddy bear for Brown Bear or battery-opperated frog with Jump, Frog, Jump. The connections between actual objects, pictures, and bocabulary content in books assist young children to make the cognitive "leap" and gain meaning from participation in book reading.

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    7:52 am

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